Afternoon Baseball

Common-sense ruminations on baseball and culture.


Apparently, the only thing that gets me posting is Greg Maddux. The man is now 1-0 as a 40-year-old. 8 innings, 3 hits, 1 run. Who needs Roger Clemens?
Interesting goof -- ESPN.com said Kenny Lofton faced Maddux for the first time. Not technically true. They squared off in the 1995 World Series.

Cause I knew you were wondering, here's Maddux's splits by decade (thanks Baseball Musings):

20s (to 4/13/96): 151-94, 2.88 ERA, 300 GS (70 CG, 20 ShO), 2142 1/3 IP, 1896 H, 1488 K, 563 BB, 109 HR
30s (to 4/13/06): 169-95, 3.14 ERA, 314 GS (38 CG, 15 ShO), 2276 1/3 IP, 2193 H, 1572 K, 348 BB, 190 HR
40s: 1-0, 1.12 ERA, 1 GS, 8 IP, 3 H, 6 K, 0 BB

A clear drop-off in hits and home runs, but a higher winning percentage, way fewer walks and still a damn good decade.

1980s (1986-1989): 45-38, 3.77 ERA, 101 GS (18 CG, 5 ShO), 674 IP, 677 H, 396 K, 248 BB, 46 HR
1990s: 176-88, 2.54 ERA, 331 GS (75 CG, 23 ShO), 2394 2/3 IP, 2084 H, 1764 K, 443 BB, 111 HR
2000s (2000-2006): 99-63, 3.46 ERA, 209 GS (15 CG, 7 ShO), 1350 IP, 1328 H, 900 K, 220 BB, 142 HR

Here we get a clearer pitcher. His 1990s stats, I feel, can match up against anybody's from any decade. It's an amazing transformation from what he was in the 1980s, as well. This decade, the home-run rate is astounding, and it's actually impressive as to how many wins he has with a low ERA despite that stat. The complete-game binges are also a thing of the past (but they are for everyone, it seems).
Actually, the Day-By-Day index doesn't have tonight's game in, so that's an even 100 wins in this decade for Greg Maddux -- at age 34 and older. Not bad.

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